Numismatic Puzzle: A New Capital for the Roman People

Today’s puzzle shows us how the Roman Empire moved its centre of power around 300: on this solidus, Roma presents the globe to Emperor Constantine the Great. From then on, it was no longer the old lady on the Tiber who played first fiddle but the metropolis on the Bosporus.

Numismatic Puzzle: Electrum Stater

Today’s puzzle is an electrum stater from Milet. After solving the puzzle, you can marvel at a roaring lion!

Numismatic Puzzle: The Noble

In 1340, England’s King Edward III defeated France in a sea battle – the beginning of the Hundred Years’ War. He celebrated this victory in 1344 with a new gold coin, the noble. For centuries, the noble was an extremely popular coin on the continent, too.

Numismatic Puzzle: Zancle

In ancient times, Messina’s wealth stemmed from its protected harbour. It was formed by a crescent-shaped headland, which is the reason for its Greek name: Zancle, i.e. “scythe”. You can find the scythe on Messina’s coins too. Put it together and have a close look!

Numismatic Puzzle: Alfred the Great

When Alfred ruled over the West Saxons in the 9th century, Vikings raided Britain, his homeland. Alfred forged an alliance between numerous small realms and drove out the invaders. You can see his picture on this silver penny.

Numismatic Puzzle: Snake Basket

Today you can try your hand at a cistophorus. The silver coin was named after its motif – a basket with a snake. This “cista mystica” was part of the Bacchus cult and is depicted on the early version of this denomination from Asia Minor.

Numismatic Puzzle: Cowries

For centuries, coins faced serious competition: by cowries.

Numismatic Puzzle: The Bernese Bear

In 1493, Bern started minting guldiners. This one is from 1494. The Bernese heraldic beast (a bear) is depicted beneath the imperial eagle, the emblem of the Holy Roman Empire, in order to demonstrate that the city was not subject to anyone except the emperor himself.

Numismatic Puzzle: Charles of Anjou

On this silver coin from AD 1270, Charles of Anjou calls himself Senator of Rome – but he was actually the King of Sicily! Put the puzzle together and you will find the unusual legend.

Numismatic Puzzle: Katanga Cross

Today’s puzzle is a Katanga cross from southern Kongo.